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Parents say MPs who broke pledge should not stand for election again

Tuesday 20 November 2012NUS News

More than half (58%) of parents with children aged 18 and under say MPs who broke a pledge they signed in 2010 to vote against increasing tuition fees and to support a fairer model of funding education should not stand at the 2015 general election, a new

58% parents with children aged 18 and under say MPs who broke NUS' tuition fee pledge should not stand at the 2015 general election.

45% think MPs who broke the pledge should resign.

62% would not vote for an MP who broke this pledge.

Just 18% believe MPs who broke the pledge had a hard decision so should be forgiven, despite the Clegg 'apology'.

The National Union of Students (NUS) and YouGov poll released today also shows that nearly half of parents with children aged 18 and under (45%) think MPs who broke this pledge should resign, while more than six in ten (62%) would not vote for an MP who broke this pledge.

The poll results coincides with today’s NUS demonstration ‘Educate, Employ, Empower’ in Central London to protest at the shutting down of opportunity for the next generation and to call for investment in education and employment.

More than half (52%) parents with children aged 18 and under disagreed with the statement “MPs who broke the pledge had a hard decision to make and should be forgiven”, and just one in five (18%) agreed, despite a video ‘apology’ issued by Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg in September.

Just one in six (16%) parents said those MPs who broke the pledge were in difficult circumstances and so were right to have done so.

Liam Burns, NUS President said:

“Nick Clegg won the trust and votes of young people and their parents by signing the pledge, but has now lost them once and for all by breaking it.

“Most parents would like to see him and every other MP who broke the pledge go before they can do any more harm to the next generation.

“As students gather in London today to demand investment in education and employment, the countdown to the next general election has already begun.

“Many MPs of all party colours kept their promise, but those MPs who broke their pledge cannot wriggle their way out. They are living out their electoral lives on borrowed time.”